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Monday – Thursday: 9 am – 9 pm
Friday: 9 am – 6 pm
Saturday: 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday: 1 – 5 pm

Wednesday, February 21, 2024  |  9 am – 9 pm

Monday – Thursday: 9 am – 9 pm
Friday: 9 am – 6 pm
Saturday: 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday: 1 – 5 pm

Appendices Policies

Code Adam

Last Revised: September 16, 2016

A missing child is a serious issue and should be addressed quickly and decisively by staff. For the safety of all children who visit Glen Ellyn Public Library, the library has instituted Code Adam Procedures.

Glen Ellyn Public Library staff are trained in Code Adam Procedures, which aim to reunite a lost child with their parent or caregiver and/or notify police of a possible abduction as quickly as possible.

Code Adam can also be used for adults who may become disoriented and need staff intervention to be reunited with their caregiver.

Code of Conduct

Last Revised: January 16, 2023

Every visitor has the right to use library spaces and services undisturbed, and library staff has the right to work without undue interference. All visitors and staff should be free from any threat of harm, invasion of privacy, or gross indignity. Those whose conduct is disruptive to library operations and other visitor’s use of the library may have the privilege of using the library abridged or denied. Visitors who violate these rules and regulations may be asked to leave, or the authorities may be called. Suspected child abuse will be reported to Children’s Protective Services.

To safeguard these rights, the following rules apply to visitor behavior on all library property, library-maintained online environments, and in all communication with staff in the course of library business.

Respect Staff and Visitors
Visitors will respect the right of other visitors to enjoy the library free from disturbances that would not be reasonably expected in a public place. Visitors will additionally respect the right of library staff to do their work in a safe and respectful environment.

Conduct not permitted includes but is not limited to:

  • Harassing, or threatening others, verbally or physically.
  • Interfering with the use of or access to the library by other visitors.
  • Interfering with staff carrying out work activities.
  • Failing to comply with the direction and requests of library staff related to appropriate use of the library and compliance with policies.
  • Behaving in a loud, boisterous, abusive, threatening, insulting, profane, or other manner so as to create a nuisance or disturb the peace of other users of the library.

Respect Library Spaces and Property
Visitors will honor the community’s continued investment in the library by practicing good
stewardship of library spaces and property.

Conduct not permitted includes but is not limited to:

  • Improper use of library facilities. Use computer and digital equipment in accordance with the Computer and Internet Policy.
  • Intentionally damaging, vandalizing, mutilation, defacing, abusing, stealing, or altering library property or the property of others.
  • Removing library property from library buildings without permission.
  • Entering non-public areas of library buildings.
  • Negligence while consuming food and drink in library buildings. Eat only light snacks in the library (no messy food or full meals) and drink only covered beverages.
  • Leaving personal items unattended or allowing personal items to block access to library spaces and resources. Library staff is not responsible for monitoring or locating personal property.
  • Selling, soliciting, and/or promoting commercial enterprises or non-library activities on
    library property.
  • Bringing animals into library buildings with the exception of service animals individually trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability as recognized by the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • Solicitation of names on petitions or distributions of print material inside the library
    building.
  • Distributing leaflets, printed material, or posting notices not authorized by library administration inside the library building.
  • Use of library parking lots for illegal activities. Vehicles left in the parking lot after closing will be reported to public safety authorities.
  • Leaving a motor vehicle stranded on library property without informing the administrative office of the library of the reason for doing so and the time during the ensuing twenty-four (24) hour period when it will be removed. Motor vehicles left on library property for 24 hours or more are considered abandoned and may be removed by the library. All expenses related to the removal of any such motor vehicle or part thereon, including but not limited to fees for towing and/or for the storage of the motor vehicle shall be the sole responsibility of the motor vehicle owner. The motor vehicle owner shall reimburse the library for any costs and expenses it incurs in removing an abandoned motor vehicle.
  • Using library property, including but not limited to any parking lots to maintain, repair, or
    sell a motor vehicle or any other equipment or machinery.
  • Playing of audio equipment so others may hear it. Use headphones with all electronic and communications equipment.
  • Using threatening or harassing language.
  • Using a cell phone, pager, or other electronic device in a manner that disturbs others; cell phones and pagers should be set to silent or turned off, and when talking on a cell phone, persons should use a low conversational voice.

Respect the Health and Safety of Others
Visitors will respect the right of other visitors and library staff to experience a safe and healthy environment while on library property and will do their part to maintain that environment.

Conduct not permitted includes but is not limited to:

  • Use of tobacco, herbal, or cannabis products, or use of e-cigarette devices in the library, within 30 feet of the library’s main entrance or on the library smoke free campus.
  • Possessing or selling alcohol or any controlled substance or be being under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance as provided in the Illinois Controlled Substances Act (720 ILCS 570/102 (f), 204, 206, 208, 210 and 212) as same is amended from time to time.
  • Participating in illegal games of chance or gambling.
  • Engaging in sexual activity or sexually harassing staff or other visitors.
  • Exhibiting bodily hygiene that constitutes a nuisance or health hazard to others.
  • Possessing or use weapons on the library property and in the course of library related activities except for law enforcement and/or security personnel while engaged in official duties. Weapons include any pistol, revolver, shotgun, rifle or other firearm, BB or pellet gun, Taser or stun gun, bomb, grenade, mine or other explosive or incendiary device, ammunition, bows and arrows, dagger, stiletto, switchblade knife, or knife having a blade exceeding five inches in length, nunchakus, and metal knuckles or other similar weapon that is capable of causing death or bodily injury and is commonly used with the intent to cause death or bodily injury, and any concealed weapon except a weapon or firearm may be transported into a parking area within a person’s personal vehicle if the weapon or firearm and its ammunition remain locked in a case out of plain view within the parked vehicle. For the purpose of this regulation, the term “case” means a glove compartment or console that completely encases the weapon or firearm and its ammunition, the trunk of the vehicle or a weapon or firearm carrying box, shipping box or another container. The weapon or firearm may only be removed for the limited purpose of storage or retrieval from within the trunk of the vehicle. A weapon or firearm must first be unloaded before removal from the vehicle. For the safety and security of our visitors and staff, the library prohibits hazardous materials and substances from being brought onto library property except for library business. This includes a substance or combination of substances which because of its quantity, concentration or physical, chemical, or infectious characteristics, may cause or contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious illness or pose a present or potential threat to human health, safety, or welfare or to the environment when improperly stored, transported, used, or disposed of or otherwise managed. Those substances considered to be hazardous materials shall include, but shall not be limited to:
    • Any explosive or flammable material which might endanger the health of visitors and staff or the general safety of the library. Some examples of items in this category would include: any kind of ammunition or munitions or related mechanisms, gases and gas containers, flammable liquid fuels, any kind of firework, paint containers, and materials;
    • Any chemical or toxic substance, such as: acids and alkalis, corrosive or bleaching substances, disabling or incapacitating sprays, radioactive materials, poisons;
      Infectious or biologically hazardous materials, e.g., contaminated blood, bacteria, and viruses.
  • Light, maintain, or make use of any fire on library property.
  • Failure to monitor and care for children or vulnerable adults in one’s charge. Ensure that your children under the age of seven are in the library with a responsible caregiver (13 years of age or older) at all times. Provide transportation for your children ages 7-11 from library grounds at the time of closing.
  • Engaging in any acts in violation of any federal, state, or local law including any criminal statute or ordinance.
  • Entering library buildings not fully clothed (including shoes and shirt) or sexually harass< staff or other patrons.
  • Using the library restroom for bathing, shampooing, washing dishes or as a laundry.
  • Entering a library area or restroom designated for use only by the opposite sex unless such person is no more than four (4) years of age provided, however, the library will make accommodations for a transgender person as required by law.
  • Intentionally or knowingly by any means cause bodily harm or make physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature with another person on library property.
  • Any activity which may be reasonably expected to result in injury to self or others.

Collection Development Plan

Last Revised: January 1, 2021

It is the policy of Glen Ellyn Public Library to develop and maintain a superior collection of materials with available financial resources. It is the policy of Glen Ellyn Public Library to seek input from diverse resources in the community regarding purchase suggestions. Further, it is the policy of the library not to use its collection to promote particular beliefs or views. Rather, through its collection, the library provides material which visitors can examine freely and draw their own conclusions.

Responsibility for this policy rests with the library Board of Trustees. Implementation of the policy is delegated by the Board to the Library Director and staff who shall abide by the following collection development procedures governing the selection, acquisition, and weeding of library materials of all formats.

Glen Ellyn Public Library upholds and promotes the American Library Association in the following statements.

  • Library Bill of Rights
  • Freedom to Read
  • Freedom to View

Collection Development Procedures

Library staff shall follow criteria for selection of materials for the library’s collections. The criteria are designed to make available a variety of materials that meet the educational, informational, cultural, and recreational interests and needs of the residents of Glen Ellyn. The criteria include the value of the material to the library and the public, regardless of the personal taste of the selectors

  • variety of views on important, complicated, and/or controversial questions, regardless of
    whether these views contain unpopular or unorthodox opinions
  • variety of views from input by diverse resources in the community
  • judgments of trained staff, experts, and book reviewers

All acquisitions, whether purchased or donated, shall be governed by this document.

Recommendations for the purchase of library materials may be submitted by the general public to the library, which will base a decision to purchase upon the criteria herein.

The Collection Development Policy and Procedures shall be reviewed at least every three years in order to respond to the changing needs of Glen Ellyn residents.

Collection Development Plan

Selection Guidelines

All materials and electronic sources comprising the collection will be selected with consideration for, but not limited to, the following aspects:

  • Interest to visitors
  • Popularity of the author
  • Authenticity of the information
  • Authority of the author or publisher
  • Physical features and format
  • Price
  • Currency of the material
  • Space to house the material
  • Ability to troubleshoot and keep the material in good working order

No title is excluded on the basis of moral, racial, religious, or political prejudice. Titles are selected, within the limitations of the budget, on the basis of critical consensus among recognized subject authorities. Qualitative standards include checking subject areas against standard bibliographic tools and recommended subject lists to be sure that the library is acquiring recommended materials.

Due to the vast number of titles published and the limits of the library’s budget, Glen Ellyn Public Library cannot possibly purchase all materials published.

Selection in all areas of the library will be focused on ordering materials to meet the needs of the Glen Ellyn Community.

Print
Reviews and recommendations of materials are consulted before purchasing most materials. Sources consulted for objective reviews of reference materials include, but are not limited to: Library Journal, Booklist, and Publisher’s Weekly. Online sources are consulted. Materials are also examined by library staff at conference exhibits and bookstores. Publishers’ ads and brochures are checked for new titles. Electronic selection lists provided by library vendors are used to bolster areas of the collection.

Cardholder and diverse community resource input will also be used to aid in the evaluation of the collection. Suggestions from visitors are encouraged and will be given due consideration. In most cases, the library will not purchase self-published material because it is not reviewed in established review sources, and because staff are unable to order through pre-approved book wholesalers. An exception may be made for Glen Ellyn local authors. Local authors are encouraged to donate their books to the Emerging Author Collection.

The library does not usually purchase spiral bound titles, and hardback binding is generally preferred if available for most collections.

When selecting magazines and newspapers, staff will give preference to titles of broad, general appeal over highly specialized or scholarly journals. Cost is also a determining factor.

Library of Things
Reviews and recommendations of materials are consulted before purchasing most materials.

Online sources are consulted. Materials are also examined by library staff at conference exhibits and bookstores.

Cardholder input and input from diverse community resources will also be used to aid in the evaluation of the collection. Suggestions from visitors are encouraged and will be given due consideration.

Retention & Weeding

Retention and weeding in all areas of the library will be focused on retaining those materials and resources that meet the needs of the Glen Ellyn community.

Retention of print or electronic materials and Library of Things items is based on the likelihood of a historical interest in the field, as well as the timeliness of a title and its informational content. Cardholder demand and circulation statistics also have an impact on the retention or replacement of materials.

Weeding of print or electronic materials and Library of Things items is done on an ongoing basis as needed. Weeding criteria for both print and electronic materials will be currency and demand for the subject matter. The physical condition of heavily used print materials will also be a consideration.

An essential consideration in retention of online database products is visitor use. A subscription database that does not show adequate use considering the cost of the product over a time period of a year or more will be replaced or removed.

Titles of newspapers and magazines are kept for varying lengths of time, depending on space.

Emerging Author Collection
To support self-published authors whose works may not yet meet all of the criteria for the permanent collection, the library will establish an Emerging Author collection that will be subject to the following guidelines.

Books will be accepted as donations from the author or publisher and selected for inclusion in the Emerging Author collection by the librarian responsible for that genre or subject area. Authors must be residents of the greater Chicago metropolitan area or the book must take place in metro Chicago. Books will be included based on condition and perceived demand or interest by the Glen Ellyn community.

Due to staffing and time constraints, staff are not able to meet with individual authors, nor notify authors if books are not accepted.

Items will rotate out of the collection and may be withdrawn, depending on demand and established weeding criteria.

All materials that are donated become the property of Glen Ellyn Public Library and cannot be returned to the donor.

Donations that are not accepted into the collection will be sent to the Friends of the Library for use in their book sales.

Borrowing from other Libraries
The library participates in SWAN Library Services, an automation consortium of 100 public libraries in RAILS (Reaching Across Illinois Library System). Cardholders are able to place their own reserves directly on most materials without contacting a staff member. Outside of the SWAN system, the library also makes every attempt to Interlibrary Loan (ILL) materials for our cardholders from other owning libraries, at no charge for most materials.

In addition, the library is fortunate to be located in an area where there are two academic libraries nearby (College of DuPage and Wheaton College), where residents have access to materials.

Selection sources of audiovisual materials will also include catalogs (Ingram Advance, Facets Media, Midwest Tape, Recorded Books, Audio Editions, etc.), general interest newspapers, periodicals, and cardholder requests. Appropriateness and expected long-term use will be deciding factors in selection.

The online database collection complements the “electronic branch” concept of library services. Factors in selection include reference value, availability of print equivalent, subscription cost, availability of remote access, and cardholder demand. Priority items will be those products which provide a unique service, provide added value to their print equivalents, and products which are the equivalent of large paper collections.

Staff will make every opportunity to see demonstrations of potential databases at conferences or at other libraries, or to obtain trial subscriptions of potential databases, before purchasing. Catalogs from publishers and distributors and cardholder recommendations will be used to identify new subscriptions of possible interest.

Methods of evaluation include comparisons to similar products, demonstrations, literature reviews, and peer consultation. Criteria may include:

  • Authority of contributors
  • Timeliness and accuracy
  • Quality and uniqueness of information
  • Target audience
  • Depth of coverage
  • Interface that encourages effective use
  • Price
  • Vendor reputation
  • Customer support
  • Advantage/availability over comparable print resource
Role of the Collection

The collections of Glen Ellyn Public Library serve the following purposes:

  • Education Support for high school through adult learners
  • Popular Materials Selections
  • Reference
  • Education Support

The collection’s educational role is to support formal education from high school through adult independent learning. In addition, some material may be collected for visitors for whom English is a new language (ENL) as determined by the community’s changing demographics.

Selectors will bear in mind the needs of students, particularly recurring assignments, in developing the collections. However, high school and college textbooks will generally not be purchased. The library does keep a separate, non-circulating collection of textbooks provided by local schools. These are donated by the schools and the library requests updates as needed.

In order to meet the needs of adult independent learners, the print and electronic collections will provide a broad range of information in all subject areas. A basic selection of the principal works in each subject area and of classic fiction also will be maintained.

Interlibrary Loan service will be provided on request to supply most professional and academic level titles for which there is no general demand.

Popular Materials Selections
Popular materials are those which are in demand by the community. Selectors will take into consideration demand as reflected by reserve/purchase requests and may consult community groups or subject experts regarding special needs for materials in specific subject areas. Multiple copies will be purchased in various formats to meet cardholder demand. After initial demand has passed, most duplicate copies will be removed from the collection, due to lack of space.

Reference
A general collection of print and electronic reference sources will be maintained. The combined print and electronic reference collection will cover all disciplines at a basic level. Most print reference sources are available for in-library use only. Most electronic resources are available 24/7 through gepl.org with a Glen Ellyn Public Library card.

Due to the nature of reference material, the reference collection cannot be comprehensive. More in-depth research materials can be found at the local academic libraries.

Print reference materials which are in high demand and require extended use may be duplicated in the circulating collection.

A small collection of local history materials is maintained as reference material. In general, questions of this nature are referred to the Glen Ellyn Historical Society.
Book Collections
Reference
The availability of information on the Internet has increased our library’s access to timely information, necessitating a smaller more select print reference collection. This collection serves the general public; thus, the library does not have extensive legal, tax, or medical information appropriate for professionals practicing in these areas. The Reference Collection is continuously updated.

Fiction
The Fiction collection encompasses general fiction, mysteries, and science fiction. Well- reviewed titles are given a priority. The replacement of tattered copies of classic fiction is an ongoing expenditure. The majority of fiction purchases will be hardbound, but paperbound
copies may be purchased as replacements. Every attempt is made to acquire and maintain books in a series written by a popular author. The number of copies purchased of popular fiction will be based on demand. Once an individual title is no longer in high demand the library will reduce the number of copies of that title.

Biographies
Biographies commonly found at the classification number 920 will be separated out into their own section. Biographies and autobiographies of single individuals are here, with the exception of sports celebrities and artists, which will be found in the 700s.

Biographies about more than one person are usually classified in the most appropriate Dewey area. The titles are classified by the name of the subject of the book.

Large Print
Large Print titles are usually duplicates of popular interest titles held in the other collections, both fiction and nonfiction.

Mass Market Paperbacks
The mass market paperback collection is meant as a non-comprehensive, rotating collection of current, popular interest titles, including genre fiction. Only fiction will be purchased in mass market paperback format. Tattered copies with high circulation will be replaced.

Graphic Novels
The Graphic Novel collection consists of fiction and nonfiction titles in pictorial form using text and sequential art to tell the story. Preference is given to hardcover titles, although paperbacks will be purchased when that is the only available format. Selection criteria are the same as above but also include the quality of graphics.

Young Adult/Teens
The library will maintain a collection of fiction which appeals primarily to young people of high school age. The collection will include some classics commonly read in high school but will be primarily a browsing collection of popular materials for this age group. Every effort will be made to acquire books on local school reading lists. When appropriate, books will be purchased in paperback format.

Nonfiction
The nonfiction collection of Glen Ellyn Public Library is classified in the Dewey Decimal System and uses Library of Congress Subject Headings. Additional copies of popular nonfiction will be purchased based on demand. Once an individual title is no longer in high demand, the library will reduce the number of copies of that title.

000 – Generalities
Areas of special emphasis include: computer science and the internet; journalism and publishing; and readers’ advisory. The computer book collection will address the needs of home computer users. Some titles on older software applications are kept, but the bulk of this section is devoted to newer software titles that are currently in widespread use.

100 – Philosophy and Psychology
Special emphasis will be placed on self-help materials and topics in demand for school assignments.

200 – Religion
The collection will include a general overview of each of the major world religions. Mythologies of the world will be covered on a basic level.

300 – Social Sciences
Areas of special emphasis in the social sciences include: college guides and test prep; finance and investment; legal guides; and true crime. Current information is crucial in most of these areas. Tax guides are kept for seven years. Multiple copies are weeded after the current tax year.

400 – Language
The collection will include English grammar, usage, and etymological materials; a dictionary and grammar book for each major language; and materials meant for visitors for whom English is a new language. The English as a New Language (ENL) collection does include some textbooks and workbooks. This is a developing collection and will be periodically evaluated to insure that it meets the needs of the Glen Ellyn community.

500 – Science
This collection will include books on natural history, mathematics, and pure sciences for the layperson. An emphasis is placed on materials for students, high school through basic college. This is another area where the library does purchase some textbooks, since they are frequently the best source for well-written overviews on physics, mathematics, astronomy, etc.

600 – Applied Science and Technology
Areas of special emphasis in the 600s include: health and specific diseases; gardening; cooking (including special diets and ethnic cuisines); business/jobs; parenting; and home construction projects. The subject area of medicine will consist of lay-level books on specific diseases, systems of the body, and health encyclopedias.

700 – Arts
Areas of special emphasis in the arts include: hobbies and crafts; interior design and home decoration; architecture; performing arts; and sports.

800 – Literature
The collection will cover world literature on a basic level. Special emphasis will be placed on the following: Shakespeare plays and criticism; drama; criticism of works and authors; poetry; essays; and humor.

910-919 – Travel
This collection will cover all areas of the world, with emphasis on major international and United States cities. Multiple copies of popular travel guides will be purchased.

900 – History, Biography
Special consideration is made to balance the needs of students as well as the interests of those who simply enjoy reading history. The collection includes books on local history as well as basic books on genealogy.

Newspapers and Magazines
The Newspapers and Magazine collection consists of approximately 200 titles, including reference serials. The collection includes popular titles in a broad range of subject areas.

Databases and Electronic Resources
The electronic collection will reflect the academic needs of students at the junior high level through college, as well as the reference needs of the general public. When feasible, electronic sources are made available from remote locations as well as inside the library. The Glen Ellyn News dating back to 1912 has been digitized and is available on public computers inside the library.

Audiovisual Materials and Resources
The library will continue to expand its collection of audiovisual formats. As new technologies emerge, older formats will be phased out, depending on cardholder demand. Shelving and storage options also have an impact on these collections.

Downloadable Materials
Through participation in consortia and purchased databases, the library offers Glen Ellyn Public Library cardholders the ability to download a variety of materials that can be viewed, read, or listened to on computers and wireless devices. Titles of downloadable materials vary according to publisher and provider.

Collection Development Plan – Youth

Last Revised: January 4, 2021

The Youth Department Director has responsibility for the collection and delegates collection management roles as needed. “Collection” in this document refers to the Youth collection.

Selection Guidelines

Print
All titles are selected with the intent of being within the general interest of children from birth through eighth grade, their grownups, and any persons who have a need for juvenile items. The Youth Department strives to meet the informational and recreational needs of this group. Specific technical titles, textbooks (with some exceptions), and workbooks are generally not considered for purchase.

Nonprint
Titles in different types of media are selected to suit the interests, preferences, and developmental needs of the targeted audience of the department. Selection sources of audiovisual materials include catalogs (Ingram Advance, Midwest Tapes, Recorded Books, etc.), general interest newspapers, periodicals, and cardholder requests. Appropriateness and expected long-term use will be deciding factors in selection.

The online database collection complements the “electronic branch” concept of library services. Factors in selection include reference value, availability of print equivalent, subscription cost, availability of remote access, and cardholder demand. Priority items will be those products which provide a unique service, provide added value to their print equivalents, and products which are the equivalent of large paper collections.

Methods of evaluation include comparisons to similar products, demonstrations, literature reviews, and peer consultation. Criteria may include:

  • Authority of contributors
  • Timeliness and accuracy
  • Quality and uniqueness of information
  • Target audience
  • Depth of coverage
  • Interface that encourages effective use
  • Price
  • Vendor reputation
  • Customer support
  • Advantage/availability over comparable print resource
Role of the Collection

The collections of the Youth Department of Glen Ellyn Public Library serve the following purposes:

  • Education Support
  • Popular Materials Selections
  • Education Support

The collection’s educational role is to support formal education through eighth grade. In addition, material is collected in our Parent/Teacher section for adults seeking information on topical parenting topics. Selectors bear in mind the needs of students, particularly recurring assignments, in developing the collections. Although curriculum-related items may be purchased in accordance with the collection development criteria, items are not specifically purchased for an individual school’s program or curriculum.

Popular Materials Selections
Popular materials are those which are in demand by the community. Selectors take into consideration demand as reflected by award lists, reserve/purchase requests, and may consult community groups or subject experts regarding special needs for materials in specific subject areas.

Multiple copies and multiple formats are purchased to meet cardholder demand. After initial demand has passed, most duplicate copies are removed from the collection, due to lack of space and condition of the item.

Book Collections
Board Books
Board books are sturdy concept books designed to be handled by infants and toddlers. The size of the book and the durability of any moving parts are important purchase considerations.

Picture Books
Picture books include fiction and concept books usually intended for an adult to read to a child from infant to age eight. The picture book collection is organized into categories and sub- categories to allow for easy browsing by both children and adults. Holiday picture books are stickered with holiday stickers and shelved in the Juvenile Holiday collection, rather than the picture book collection. The books in this section must be durable because of their audience, so library binding hardbacks are preferred. However, the library purchases current, popular material, such as favorite character picture books or television and movie tie-ins, which may be in paperback binding. Picture books which are on the annual Monarch nominee list are purchased in paperback, if available, to meet increased demand.

Early Readers
Early reader books are written for beginning to emergent readers below a third grade reading level. The early reader collection is organized into five levels with colored stickers on the spine indicating the level of the book. Each book is read prior to processing to determine the level.

The level is chosen based on various criteria, including number of words per page, sentence structure, illustrative support, and vocabulary. Hardcover bindings are preferred, although the library purchases current, popular material, such as movie tie-ins written at this level, whether in paperback or hardcover binding. Boxed sets of small paperbacks are purchased and are designed to circulate as one packaged unit. Holiday early readers are stickered with holiday stickers and shelved in the Juvenile Holiday collection, rather than the Early Readers. Early reader books which are on the annual Monarch nominee list are purchased in paperback, if available, to meet increased demand. An early reader nonfiction collection has been pulled out of the nonfiction collection and shelved separately within the early reader collection. These organization of these books considers their Dewey Decimal number as well as their reading level. Readers are added to the Monarch shelf as needed, and in paperback, if available. An early reader nonfiction collection has been pulled out of the nonfiction collection and shelved separately within the early reader collection. The early reader nonfiction collection is shelved by reading level and then by author.

Fiction
Fiction contains books written for second through fifth grade readers, which comprises a wide range of reading levels and content. Genre labels assist visitors in finding books to suit their needs. In addition, transitional chapter books which are at a second or third grade reading level have an “owl” spine label. The library relies on professional reviews to determine whether a title is appropriate for juvenile fiction, or is better suited in early readers or middle school fiction. The Youth Department does not keep a comprehensive collection of series if the circulation rates do not justify. Fiction books which are on the annual Bluestem or Rebecca Caudill nominee lists are purchased in paperback, if available, to meet increased demand.

Graphic Novels
The Graphic Novel collection consists of fiction and nonfiction titles in pictorial form using text and sequential art to tell the story. Preference is given to hardcover titles, although paperbacks will be purchased when that is the only available format. Selection criteria are the same as above but also include the quality of graphics.

Middle School Fiction
Middle School Fiction contains books written for sixth through eighth grade readers, which comprises a wide range of reading levels and content. Books in this collection are identified with a colored overlay sticker on the spine. Genre labels assist visitors in finding books to suit their needs. Hardcover bindings are preferred, but paperback titles are purchased when hardcover is not available. Staff rely on professional reviews to determine whether a title is appropriate for middle school fiction or is better suited in juvenile fiction or the Young Adult collections. The Youth Department does not keep a comprehensive collection of series if the circulation rates do not justify. Middle School fiction books which are on the annual Rebecca Caudill nominee list are purchased in paperback, if available, to meet increased demand.

Nonfiction
The nonfiction collection of Glen Ellyn Public Library is classified in the Dewey Decimal System and uses Library of Congress Subject Headings. The collection is predominantly a print collection, although nonfiction audiovisual formats are classified with Dewey numbers. The Youth Department strives to provide a wide range of reading levels throughout the collection. Once an individual title is no longer popular, the library will reduce the copies of that title.

000 – Generalities
Common subjects include computers, world records, unidentified flying objects, and ancient mysteries.

100 – Philosophy and Psychology
Common subjects include Salem Witch Trials, optical illusions, feelings, character education, and self-esteem.

200 – Religion
Common subjects include a general overview of each of the major world religions, as well as mythologies of the world and Christian entertainment media such as VeggieTales.

300 – Social Sciences
Common subjects include family issues, social issues, environmental issues, government, military, holidays, folktales and fairy tales. Youth Services maintains a large collection of folktales, and fairy tales representing a wide range of cultural traditions.

400 – Language
Common subjects include English grammar, sign language, dictionaries, and foreign language instructional as well as recreational reading material. The foreign language collection evolves to meet the changing needs of our residents.

500 – Science
Common subjects include science experiments, natural sciences, dinosaurs, mathematics, pure sciences, biomes, botany, and animals for the student.

600 – Applied Science and Technology
Common subjects include toilet training, human body, machinery, space flight, farming, pets, cookery, and architecture.

700 – Arts
Common subjects include art, crafts, performing arts, riddles, games. and sports.

800 – Literature
Common subjects include poetry, children’s literature collections, and plays.

900 – History and Geography
Common subjects include pirates, explorers, saints, atlases, countries, ancient civilizations, history, and Native Americans.

Biographies
Biographies and autobiographies of single individuals are here, while collective biographies are found in the 900s or in the appropriate Dewey area for their topic.

Parenting
Parenting material is written at an adult level and covers parenting topics and school curriculum topics. Common subjects include children’s literacy and child-rearing. Paperback workbooks may be purchased to support curriculum needs. The parenting collection is organized by categories to allow for easy browsing. There is some intentional duplication of material also found in the Adult Department.

Magazines
The magazine collection is intended to include educational popular titles in a broad range of subject areas for preschool through eighth grade. The majority of the titles are at the elementary school level. There is no duplication between Youth, YA, and Adult titles.

Databases and Electronic Resources
The electronic collection will reflect the academic needs of schools and community members birth through eighth grade and their caregivers. When feasible, electronic sources are made available from remote locations as well as inside the library. When possible, the library looks to partner with local schools to offer databases that are needed and promoted within the schools and the curriculum.

Audiovisual Materials and Resources
The library continues to expand its collection of audiovisual formats. Appropriateness and expected long-term use are the deciding factors in selection. As new technologies emerge, older formats will be phased out, depending on cardholder demand. Shelving and storage options also have an impact on this collection.

Downloadable Materials
Through participation in consortia and purchased databases, the library offers Glen Ellyn card holders the ability to download a variety of materials that can be viewed, read, or listened to on computers and wireless devices. Titles of downloadable materials vary according to publisher and provider.

Non-Books
Non-book materials are purchased based on the changing needs within the community. These can be educational or popular but not commonly owned items. As the needs of the community change, some materials will be phased out, and others will be introduced into the collection.

Donation Guidelines

Last Revised: October 17, 2005

Glen Ellyn Public Library does not have sufficient space or atmospheric or security controls to be considered a suitable place for any but a very few pieces of permanently displayed works of art or historic artifacts.

The library primarily confines itself to providing a location for temporary displays of local art from community residents, typically changed on a monthly basis.

As currently interpreted by the library, our current mission precludes us from devoting significant space to permanent displays of art or other objects. As a result, the library must be extremely selective in its choices.

In considering any potential donation, consideration will be given to

  • Availability of space not required for other library mission-critical functions
  • Degree to which the piece enhances current activities of the library
  • Specific relevance to the community, and perceived community demand for display
    of the object
  • Local connections to the artist and/or benefactor
  • Professional quality of the item
  • Suitability of the piece for display inside or outside the building
  • Location of an appropriate spot for the placement of the piece
  • Potential for problems regarding patron safety
  • Vulnerability of the piece to theft or damage, and related additional insurance costs,
    if any

The library encourages all potential donors to discuss their interests with the library at an early stage to determine if some mutually satisfactory donation decision can be reached. The Board and staff will do their utmost to recommend potential donation projects that suit the desires of the donor and the long-term needs of the library.

Emerging Author Collection

Last Revised: January 20, 2022

The library wishes to support self-published authors whose works may not yet meet all of the criteria for the permanent collection. The library will establish an Emerging Author Collection that will be subject to the following guidelines.

Books will be accepted as donations from the author or publisher and selected for inclusion in the Emerging Author Collection by the librarian responsible for that genre or subject area. Authors must be residents of the greater Chicago metropolitan area or the book must take place in metro Chicago. Books will be included based on condition and perceived demand or interest by the Glen Ellyn community.

Due to staffing and time constraints, staff are not able to meet with individual authors, nor notify authors if books are not accepted.

Items will rotate out of the collection and may be withdrawn, depending on demand and established weeding criteria (see Retention and Weeding).

All materials that are donated become the property of Glen Ellyn Public Library and cannot be returned to the donor.

Donations that are not accepted into the collection will be sent to the Friends of the Library for use in their book sales.

Exam Proctoring

Last Revised: January 20, 2022

Staff at the 2nd Floor Information Desk are available to proctor exams. Exam proctoring is free for Glen Ellyn residents. Non-residents can pay a $10 per exam fee when the exam is taken. The library offers a quiet place to take an exam and staff to verify students’ identities. Staff do not sit with the students to watch them take the test. If a school requires supervision during the exam, library staff cannot proctor the test.

All exams must be completed 30 minutes prior to the posted library closing time.

Written Exams
Students must plan with the school to have the test sent to the library. Students will be charged printing costs of 10 cents per page for tests that are faxed or emailed. Students are not allowed to mail tests back themselves. Exams will be mailed or faxed back to the school within 24 hours. All mailed tests must have a postage-paid return envelope. The library is not responsible for U.S. mail service delays and does not provide a receipt of mailing.

No appointment is necessary for written tests, but the student should contact the 2nd Floor Information Desk to confirm that the exam has arrived. Any librarian may act as a proctor.

Exams that have not been taken within four weeks of receipt at the library will be mailed back, blank, to the school.

Online Exams
Online exams require an appointment. In order to reserve a computer for a specific time, please make an appointment at the 2nd Floor Information Desk. Twenty four-hour notice is appreciated. The library does not proctor exams on laptops because we cannot guarantee uninterrupted connectivity. Students who are not Glen Ellyn residents must be 18 or older to take online exams.

Identity Protection

Last Revised: March 21, 2011

The policy with Regard to the Collection, Use, Disclosure and Protection of Individuals’ Social Security Numbers is intended to comply with Public Act 96-0874 of the State of Illinois, cited as the Identity Protection Act (“Act”).

This policy does not supersede any more restrictive law, rule, or regulation regarding the collection, use, or disclosure of social security numbers.

Investments

Last Revised: February 12, 2012

Purpose and Scope

The purpose of this policy statement is to outline the responsibilities, general objectives, and specific guidelines for management of public funds by Glen Ellyn Public Library. Its scope is all funds of the library.

Responsibilities

All investment policies and procedure of Glen Ellyn Public Library will be in accordance with Illinois law. The authority of the library Board of Trustees to control and invest public funds is defined in the Illinois Public Funds Investment Act and the investments permitted are described therein. Administration and execution of these policies are the responsibility of the Treasurer, who is hereby delegated as “Chief Investment Officer” of the library acting under the authority of the library Board of Trustees.

Delegation of Authority

Administrative responsibility for the investment program is delegated by the Chief Investment Officer. The Library Director and Business Manager are responsible for establishing internal controls and written procedures for the operation of the investment program. Investment decisions are made in conjunction with the Chief Investment Officer of the library.

“Prudent Person” Standard

All library investment activities administered by Glen Ellyn Public Library Board shall use a “prudent person” standard of care. Public funds shall be handled with judgment and care, under circumstances then prevailing, which persons knowledgeable of investment and treasury management practices and persons of prudence, discretion, and intelligence exercise in the management of their own affairs, not for speculation, but for investment, considering the safety of their capital as well as the possible income to be derived.

Objectives

The following objectives, in priority order, will be considered in selecting financial institutions and investment instruments

  • Safety of principal
  • Liquidity
  • Rate of return
Guidelines

The following guidelines shall be used to meet the general investment objectives:

Safety

Authorized investments include and will primarily consist of: Certificates of Deposit, Treasury Bills and other securities guaranteed by the U.S. government, participation in the State of Illinois Public Treasurer’s Investment Pool and Illinois Metropolitan Investment Fund.

All deposits with financial institutions other than those secured by the FDIC shall be fully collateralized at not less than one hundred ten percent (110%) of the fair market value of the funds secured. Pledged collateral will be held either by the library or in safekeeping and evidenced by the safekeeping agreement. If collateral is held in safekeeping, it shall be held by a third party acceptable to the library or by an escrow agent of the pledging institution.

Custody of any investments in US Government securities other than those of the US Treasury will be held by a third party custodian rather than the original investment broker.

Liquidity

The investment structure shall remain sufficiently liquid to assure that the operating requirements of the library are met in a timely fashion.

Rate of Return

The library Board will seek to regularly take advantage of the highest rate of return available from approved securities. The library will endeavor to keep all available cash invested in interest-bearing accounts.

Maintaining the Public Trust

The library will avoid any transaction that might impair its public confidence. Diversification will be sought in order to minimize the risk of loss associated with any individual security type or individual financial institution.

Reporting

Fund balances and the status of such accounts will be reported at each regularly scheduled meeting of the library Board and at least quarterly include information regarding securities in the portfolio. At least annually, the Chief Investment Officer shall review this policy for any needed modifications and report to the Board on the investment portfolio, its effectiveness in meeting the library’s need for safety, liquidity, rate of return, diversification, and general performance.

Annual Audit

The required annual examination of the financial statements of the library will include an examination of the application of the library’s treasury management. The examination shall include an evaluation of controls in place to prevent the possible loss of funds arising from fraud, error, misrepresentation, theft, or imprudent actions by the employees or agents of the library.

Conflicts of Interest

Officers and employees involved in the investment process shall refrain from personal business activities that might conflict with the proper execution and management of this investment program, or that could impair their ability to make impartial decisions, or that could give the appearance of impropriety.

Loan Periods, Renewals, Fees, and Borrowing Restrictions

Last Revised:

Notices
Cardholders can choose to receive notices via email, text, phone, or mail. Notices are a courtesy and do not relieve the cardholder of responsibility.

Renewal notices and/or Courtesy notices are sent two days prior to an item’s due date.
Overdue notices for unreturned items are sent when item reaches 7 days 21 days overdue.
A bill for the cost of the item(s) and any other fees is sent at 42 days overdue.
Collection notices may be sent 10 days after the bill notice.

Loan Periods
Loan periods (due dates) vary by material type.

  • Nine weeks: Exercise DVDs that are specifically marked
  • Three weeks: Most materials
  • Two weeks: New Adult books, Hot Pick books, New Non-Fiction DVDs, and TV Shows
  • One week: Entertainment DVDs, Games, Playaway Views
  • Three days: Hot Pick DVDs

Renewals
Eligible materials may be renewed up to five times. An item may not renew if it

  • is on hold for another borrower
  • is part of a non-renewable collection, such as Hot Pick books and HotPick DVDs
  • has already been renewed the maximum number of times
  • is borrowed on an account that has reached its fines threshold
  • was retrieved from a library outside of the SWAN library system, such as through
    WorldCat
  • was retrieved for a Book Discussion group

Fees
Glen Ellyn Public Library does not charge late fees for overdue items.

Lost Items
An item is considered lost when a cardholder reports an item lost or when an item reaches 42 days overdue. The cost of the item and a processing fee will be billed to the cardholder’s account and their borrowing privileges will be suspended until the item is returned and/or all associated fees have been paid. The library does not accept replacements for lost items.

Finding a Lost Item
If an item was lost and paid for but is returned within three months of the due date, the cost of the item will be refunded minus a $3 fee. After three months, all charges are non-refundable, and the item is non-returnable.

Damaged Items and Missing Pieces
If an item is returned in poor condition, wet and/or moldy, if the cover or pages are defaced, or if a piece is missing, the most recent borrower will be contacted. The borrower may be charged for the cost of the item and a processing fee or may be charged a fee to replace a missing part. Replacement costs are determined by the average replacement cost and are non-refundable. The library does not accept replacements for damaged items.

Borrowing Restrictions
Cardholders’ borrowing privileges will be suspended when they reach the following thresholds.

Glen Ellyn Public Library Cardholders

  • Five or more items overdue
  • $10 in unpaid fees
  • One or more items 42 days late
  • $30 or more in outstanding fees. In this case, a bill will be sent to a collection agency and the
    cardholder will be charged an additional $10.

Cardholders from libraries outside of SWAN Library Services

  • Fifty items checked out
  • Five holds
  • Five or more items overdue
  • $10 in unpaid fees
  • One or more items 42 days late

Cosigners on library cards are financially responsible for any fees accrued on cards for which they have cosigned. Therefore, their borrowing privileges will be suspended until any issues are resolved.

Patron Discipline Procedures and Guidelines

Last Revised:

General Statement of Purpose
The intent of this document is to provide guidance to the staff of Glen Ellyn Public Library in determining appropriate discipline for patron misbehavior while on library grounds.

Legal Basis for Action
Glen Ellyn Public Library’s legal basis for discipline directed toward users of the library is based on two sections of State statute law, relating to the powers and duties of a library board of trustees (ILCS 5/4-7) “Each board of library trustees…shall carry out the spirit and intent of this Act in establishing, supporting and maintaining a public library or libraries for providing library service and, in addition to but without limiting other powers conferred by this Act, shall have the following powers”

  • To make and adopt such bylaws, rules, and regulations, for their own guidance and for the government of the library as may be expedient, not inconsistent with this Act.
  • To exclude from the use of the library any person who willfully violates the rules prescribed by the board.

Delegation of Immediate Response to Library Staff
The Person in Charge (PIC) as an “agent” of the library Board, is empowered to take disciplinary action on behalf of the library, up to and including expulsion from the library.

General Categories of Action
The categories of action available to the staff are

  • Verbal warning (see details below) – delivered by staff witnessing the behavior
  • Written warning (see details below) – delivered by PIC
  • One to seven-day expulsion (see Expulsions / No Trespass Order below) – delivered by PIC
  • Longer expulsion (see Expulsions / No Trespass Order below) – subject to the approval of
    the Library Director
  • No Trespass Order (see Expulsions / No Trespass Order below)

Verbal warning
Inform the individual of the inappropriate behavior, sharing with them a copy of the Code of Conduct and referencing the line or lines that pertain to the situation. If the individual or individuals do not correct the inappropriate behavior, politely but firmly ask the individual or individuals to leave. If they do not respond to the request either by correcting the behavior or leaving, again ask them to leave and let them know if they do not conform you will call 911. If they do not respond to the second request, call the police.

Written warning
If an individual has left the building without a staff member informing them of the inappropriate behavior, a written letter should be prepared to be presented to the individual the next time they visit the library. A written warning should include the individual’s name, a description of the inappropriate behavior, a reference to the Code of Conduct infraction and appropriate behavior expected, a printed copy of the Code of Conduct, and a date when the individual may return to the library.

Least Severe Sanction/Proportionality
The library will attempt to levy the least severe sanction on library patrons to gain compliance with acceptable behavior, and in proportion with the severity of the violation of library rules.

Progressive Discipline
If a sanction brought against a particular library patron does not produce acceptable behavior, the intent of the library will be to increase the severity and duration of the subsequent sanctions.

Expulsions / No Trespass Order
In the case of expulsions longer than a single day, the library will prepare and present a written statement of expulsion to the offending party, which will include a description of the inappropriate behavior, any relevant behavioral past history with the library, and a date when reconsideration of their library use status could be requested.

In many instances, the library may request police assistance in delivering this letter, and in turn request the creation of a “no trespass” letter, to be kept on file with the Glen Ellyn Police, which serves as the legal basis for arrest if the individual returns to the library after receiving the notice. If possible, have the Library Director sign the No Trespass Order.

Review of Decision
An individual may immediately request, in writing or by phone, an administrative reconsideration of the expulsion decision. The reconsideration will be conducted by the Library Director, in consultation with the library Board, and will be communicated back to the person in a timely fashion, if patron contact information is available.

Expulsion decision letters will automatically include a date after which future reconsideration will be entertained.

In all cases, the stated period prior to potential reconsideration will not extend beyond one year.

Expelled patrons MUST in all cases request reconsideration, in writing, or by phone, addressed to the Library Director. Persons attempting to visit library property prior to notice of favorable reconsideration will still be subject to the legally enforceable “no trespass order.”

Formally received requests for consideration will be reviewed by library management staff and other staff members involved with the incidents prompting expulsion.

A recommendation for action will be presented to the library Board of Trustees for approval.

The decision will be communicated back to the individual by phone or in writing if contact information is available.

If the decision is favorable to the patron, the Glen Ellyn Police will be informed that the “no trespass” order should be lifted.

If initially unsuccessful, the person may request future reconsiderations of status at one year intervals, from the date of the most recent reconsideration decision.

Photography and Video

Last Revised: July 15, 2019

The library has a significant interest in maintaining an environment that allows cardholders to freely access library information and resources. This significant interest requires the library to maintain policies that protect the privacy of its cardholders and staff and ensures their freedom
from harassment, intimidation, and threats to their safety and well-being. In order to provide appropriate safeguards against such behavior and enforce policies and procedures addressing that behavior when it occurs, the library has adopted the following policy regarding the taking of photographs or videos inside the library building.

General Policy
Permission is not required for taking photographs or videos in public areas of the library building for personal, noncommercial use if no tripods, lights, or other specialized equipment is used. However, there may be library locations and/or exhibition areas where the taking of photographs or videos is restricted or prohibited (i.e., restrooms, rooms reserved for nursing, museum artifacts, and archival materials). Taking photographs or videos of, or in, areas reserved for staff use only is also prohibited. If tripods, lights, or other specialized equipment is to be used, requests must be made at least 24 hours in advance. Persons taking photographs and videos shall not (i) compromise a cardholder or staff member’s right to privacy, (ii) harass, intimidate, or threaten a visitor staff, or (iii) block library aisles, walkways, stairwells, doors, or exits.

Exterior
Taking photographs and videos outside the library building and/or of the library grounds does not require permission. However, the activity may not impede the ingress or egress of visitors or staff to or from the library building.

Commercial
The library may permit use of its facilities for the taking of commercial photographs or videos if the project does not interfere with the mission of the library and is in accordance with the rest of the policy. The library will charge a fee to offset costs incurred by the library to provide access to the facility and prior per mission must be sought at least one week in advance.

Of Materials and Resources
The library permits the taking of photographs and videos of its publicly-available collections. However, visitors are solely responsible for obtaining consent or other permission when taking photographs or videos of copyrighted materials.

By the Library
The library may take photos, videos, and audio recordings at the library and during library events to use in its publicity materials and on its website and social media sites. The library reserves the right to document its services and the public’s use of the library building and grounds. These photographs, videos, and audio recordings may be copied, displayed, televised, and published (including on any library website or social media site). Any individual that does not wish the library to use a photograph or video of them or their child should inform a library staff member prior to or while such photographs or videos are being taken.

Of Library Board Meetings
Pursuant to Section 120/2.05 of the Illinois Open Meetings Act (5 ILCS 120/1 et seq.), any person may record the proceedings of the library Board and other meetings required by the Act to be open to the public. The recordings may be made by tape, film or other means and shall not disrupt the meeting or create a safety hazard.

Liability
Persons involved in taking photographs or videos are solely liable for any injuries to persons or property that result from their activities on library property. They also have sole responsibility for obtaining all necessary releases and permissions required by law from persons who can be identified in any photograph or video for copyrighted materials. The library undertakes no responsibility for obtaining these releases or permissions.

Right Subject to Compliance with Policy
The library reserves the right to ask any individual or group violating this policy to cease the taking of photographs or videos.

Public Service Standards of Excellence

Last Revised: April 4, 2023

Our Vision

Create and expect an atmosphere of courtesy, respect, and dignity.

Each customer service encounter with both members and staff can impact a person’s perceptions of the library. We will strive to provide a consistent level of excellent service that fosters good communication, is equitable, and is personalized for people of all ages and abilities.

Our Commitment

To communicate clearly

  • We are attentive and welcoming
  • We warmly greet people using eye contact as they enter our space
  • We make the person in front of us a priority with our undivided attention
  • We listen carefully
  • We ask follow-up questions
  • We are courteous in both written and verbal communication
  • We are respectful, prompt, and discrete in answering phone calls, texts, and email providing a response within 24 hours when working

To be equitable

  • We seek to understand diverse perspectives, are quickly responsive, and offer an inclusive and compassionate environment
  • We offer our services, collections, and resources to all
  • We lead with kindness and positivity
  • We approach questions without judgement
  • We protect the intellectual freedom of all
  • We enforce the code of conduct equally, and are respectful but firm with those violating our policies
  • We offer materials, programs, and services that reflect diverse cultures, races, ages, and abilities
  • We provide accommodations to individuals that may need special assistance

To provide personalized service

    • We keep informed of library events, programs, services and collections reading the weekly e-news and the quarterly Guide
    • We keep informed of library policies, and how best to implement them
    • We connect with people by being open, curious, and respectful
    • We offer unique and knowledgeable guidance
    • We work cooperatively to find creative and equitable solutions and suggest options
    • We stay informed about library trends and best practices
    • We make someone’s day by providing a remarkable experience
    • We strive to meet each person’s unique needs
    • We ask if there is anything else we can provide
    • We ask questions and take responsibility for understanding the library’s policies, procedures, and standards of service excellence

Search Warrants

Last Revised: January 18, 2021

Glen Ellyn Public Library will cooperate with Law Enforcement Officials to allow access to items within the scope of the Search Warrant while at the same time seeking to protect the rights of patrons in accordance with the Illinois Library Records Confidentiality Act (75 ILCS 70/1-2)

Designated Library Official

The Library Director will handle all requests to search library records pursuant to a Search Warrant. In the absence of the Library Director, the individuals holding the following staff positions will respond to the Search Warrant:

  • Adult Director
  • Youth Director
  • Materials Processing Manager
  • Business Manager

Identify Serving Officer

The Library Director will request identification form the Law Enforcement Officials and record their names, badge numbers and agencies.

Review Warrant for Content

The Library Director will review the Search Warrant when served and will contact library legal counsel for consultation concerning the scope of the Warrant and compliance procedures.
Library Legal Counsel Klein, Thorpe & Jenkins (312) 984-6400

  • Dennis Walsh
  • Kenneth Friker

Request the Presence of Library Legal Counsel

The Library Director will ask the Law Enforcement Officials to wait until the library Legal Counsel is present before beginning the search.

Cooperate with Officials

The Library Director will cooperate with Law Enforcement Officials to help identify the records/evidence falling within the scope of the Search Warrant.

No Access to Other Records

The Library Director will not permit access to records beyond the scope of the Search Warrant, i.e. records not specifically identified in the Search Warrant.

Record Evidence Viewed or Taken

The Library Director will record all records or evidence viewed, copied, or removed from the library pursuant to the search. The searching Officer will be asked to sign a statement verifying this record. Refusal by the searching Officer to verify their actions, in writing, will be noted.

No Disclosure of Search

No person will disclose the receipt of the Search Warrant or the search to anyone except the Library Director and / or library Legal Counsel.

Provide the Policy

To assist the Law Enforcement Officials a copy of this Search Warrant Policy will be provided promptly to the Officials upon their arrival at the library.

Security Cameras

Last Revised: March 21, 2016

Security cameras are used to enhance the safety and security of library users and staff by discouraging violations of the library’s Code of Conduct, to assist library staff in preventing the occurrence of any violations, and when necessary, to provide law enforcement assistance in prosecuting criminal activity while adhering to the applicable federal, state, and local law concerning the confidentiality of library records and the protection of individual privacy.

Security Camera Purpose and Placement Guidelines
Video recording cameras will be used in public spaces of library locations to discourage criminal activity and violations of the library’s Code of Conduct. The recording of audio is restricted under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and will not be used.

Cameras may be installed in outdoor and indoor places where individuals lack a reasonable expectation of privacy. Examples include public common areas of the library such as parking lots, entrances, seating areas, service desks, and areas prone to theft or misconduct, or areas where money is stored or handled.

Cameras will not be installed in areas of the library where individuals have a reasonable expectation of privacy such as restrooms or private offices.

Signs will be posted at all entrances informing the public and staff that security cameras are in use.

Because cameras will not be continuously monitored, the public and staff should take appropriate precautions for their safety and for the security of their personal property. Glen Ellyn Public Library is not responsible for loss of property or personal injury.

Regarding the placement and use of the digital recording cameras, staff and patron safety is the first priority; protection of library property is of secondary importance.

Cameras are not installed, nor will they be used for the purpose of routine staff performance evaluations.

Use/Disclosure of Video Records
Access to the archived footage in pursuit of documented incidents of injury, criminal activity, or violation of the library’s Code of Conduct is restricted to library staff.

All staff may have access to real-time images, viewable on desktop monitors. The frequency of viewing and the amount of video viewed will be limited to the minimum needed to give assurance that the system is working, to monitor a potential violation of the library Code of Conduct, or to ascertain if footage is available relative to a specific incident.

Access is also allowed by law enforcement when pursuant to a subpoena, court order, or for matters of local law enforcement.

Recorded data is confidential and secured in a controlled area. Video recordings will be stored for 30 days, provided no criminal activity or policy violation has occurred or is being investigated.

Video records and still photographs may be used by authorized individuals to identify those responsible for library policy violations, criminal activity on library property, or actions considered disruptive to normal library operations as delineated in the library Code of Conduct. In situations involving banned patrons, stored still images may be shared with staff system wide. Shared images may remain posted in staff areas for the duration of the banning period.

After the banning period ends, these images will be archived in the Administrative Offices for seven years.

Unauthorized Access and/or Disclosure
Confidentiality and privacy issues prohibit the general public from viewing security camera footage that contains personally identifying information about library users. If the library receives a request from the general public to inspect security camera footage, they will be advised to file a police complaint.

A breach of this policy may result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. Any library employee who becomes aware of any unauthorized disclosure of a video recording and/or a potential privacy breach has a responsibility to immediately inform the Library Director of the breach.

Disclaimer of Responsibility
A copy of this policy may be shared with any patron or staff member upon request. The policy is also posted on Glen Ellyn Public Library’s official website.

Questions from the public may be directed to the Library Director.

The library disclaims any liability for use of the video data in accordance with the terms of this policy, given that the library is a public facility, and the security cameras shall be limited to those areas where patrons and/or staff have no reasonable expectation of privacy.

Social Media Comment

Last Revised: December 19, 2022

The purpose of the Glen Ellyn Public Library social media platforms is to disseminate information about and discuss Library programs and services and relevant community events.

As a result, the Library’s social media accounts are a limited public forum. The Glen Ellyn Public Library will review all comments and posts for appropriate content. Any comments and posts containing the following are considered in violation of the library’s Member Code of Conduct and will be immediately removed by library staff:

  • Obscene, sexual, or pornographic content or language
  • Content that promotes discrimination on the basis of race, age, religion, or gender
  • Threats to any person
  • Conduct that violates any federal, state, or local law or encourages illegal activity
  • Promotion of any commercial activities
  • Spam, links, or malware
  • Advocation for or against a candidate, referendum, or campaign

By posting content on any library social media site, you agree to abide by the above rules.

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